The Frog Life Cycle Explained

Posted on March 24th, 2017

Despite having quite a few staying with us, our craft and activity hour clashed with the best day of the week and most of our guests had taken advantage of a chance to visit the beach. I had just one little girl come along who had been looking forward to it all week. Having stayed before I knew she would be fine on her own and at just 4 years old I took a gamble she would be up to understanding the frog life cycle and the associated crafts I had planned.

The Frog Life cycle Explained

 

We began by talking about frogs and seeing if we could find one in the My first Animals book I had just reviewed.  This proved no problem.

 

Finding a frog in the My First Learning Garden Book

 

Encouraged by her understanding I moved onto explaining the life cycle from frogspawn to tadpoles, froglet and finally frog with some helpful printables to match and label.

 

Completing the Frog Life Cycle worksheets

 

At just four I was keen not to overdo the formal worksheets on holiday so we set off in search of frogspawn on the farm. I’d double checked beforehand that the place I’d identified last week still had some frogspawn there. 

 

Looking for Frogspawn in the streams

 

What I hadn’t tried before was wading into the depths of the stream to pull some out. It was very boggy and I didn’t want our guests stuck in the mud so I volunteered to carefully step down the bank and pull some up in our bucket.  To our complete joy there was not only live frogspawn but tadpoles already formed and swimming around.  We tipped the contents of the bucket into a jam jar to carry back to the art table and have a closer look, stopping on the way to see the toad under the bridge, a little clue along our wildlife trail. At this moment I wished he was a frog, but it was a chance to explain the difference.

Finding frogspawn and tadpoles on the farm

 

Getting the magnifying glass out we were able to see plenty of movement in the jar.

 

Child watching tadpoles through magnifying glass

 

While the tadpoles swam round we drew frogspawn with chalk on black paper. This was super effective and easy to create a lifelike effect.

 

 

We skipped drawing tadpoles and moved onto our creative frog game. In no time a toilet roll and a stick had become a frog with a fly to catch. I promised it was possible and had the parents both trying as well as the little girl.

 

making a frog catching a fly game

 

With some pre-made paper frogs we squeezed in one more activity, decorating frogs that jumped and then laughing over table top frog races. 

 

 

Time ran away from us and we caught up with the other families returning from their days out for a last train ride. There was great interest in the crafted frog game and our little 4 year old kindly let the other children have a go with her frog.

 

Frog crafts shared with other children at the Minature Train

 

I’m so pleased I didn’t shy away from taking on the frog life cycle theme with just one, it was great to have the time and energy to ensure understanding in one so young and the frog turned into a wonderful keepsake game.

 

 

 

Have you tried explaining the frog life cycle to little ones?

Country Kids