First Lamb born into icy conditions

Posted on March 3rd, 2018

Our first born lamb of spring is always a great excitement here on the farm. We had a feeling this little cutie may have been born on Christmas Day. Gill our friendly hand raised lamb became company for our new Ram last summer. We guessed she might be too young to catch this season being under 2 years old herself, but if she did a Christmas lamb would have enjoyed a Christmas in a Manger here. As it turned out we were right and there was no Christmas lamb born. We weren’t upset though as Gill had successfully provided much needed company for Admiral Plum. Anyway it turns out he was aptly named and she must have caught a month or so after joining the Admiral as last weekend we discovered the most beautiful little first lamb skipping behind Gill on the morning feed run.

First lamb born in  2018

First born lamb of 2018 with mother sheep

 

Born in the early hours, the little lamb was on his feet and all cleaned up by Mum when we found them. It is amazing how nature kicks in, even though Gill herself was abandoned at birth and hand raised. This has one huge advantage, Gill is still so tame and trusting she will happily let all the guests pet her baby in return for a tickle under the chin and a handful of grain!

Cuddles for our new lamb

First lamb born in 2018

 

Gill and her lamb are thriving in our nursery field where all the new babies go to try and protect them from the foxes. The icy conditions are all he knows, it may sound harsh but it is actually much better mixed with sunshine than rain. There are some upsides to us missing out on the snow again!  

The children have loved helping to top up their hay

Carrying hay for Gill the sheep

 

And break the ice in their nursery water frog, aka my kids old sandpit!

breaking ice for the sheep

Being hit by storm Emma isn’t the kindest end to a week on the farm for our little lamb. 

First Lamb a week old

Hopefully there will be plenty of playmates to join our first lamb over the coming weeks. Have you seen any in the fields yet?