Easter Card and Decorative Log Craft

Posted on April 19th, 2019 - Fiona

Easter Holidays bring Easter crafts. Here on the farm the weather has been dry and sunny inspiring plenty of fun on the farm and friendship building. We have been rounding off the Easter weeks with a lovely nature inspired outdoor Easter card and decorative log craft session.

 

Nature Inspired Easter Card and Log Craft

 

Setting the challenge

It is always a joy to be able to set up outdoors in the sunshine for our craft session. I was soon joined by some eager crafters keen to discover what we would be making. I showed them my example Easter card and Decorative log pointing out that none of the things to make theirs were in sight. This had them a little confused, until I handed out a list of things for them to go and find for themselves in the fairy gardens.

Setting the Easter Card and Decorative Log Craft challenge

 

They didn’t need telling twice and raced off with their lists in search of all the things they would need.  There was quite a few items to collect and it kept them busy hunting.

 

Fairy Garden hunt for craft resources to make Easter cards and decorative logs

Easter Decorative Log Craft

Once back at the craft table, the children set straight to work on their log craft. In anticipation of a large group I had a big tub of flour and water paste ready for them to all dig in and start designing. I love the creativity that emerged, they may have taken inspiration from my log, but they certainly added their own Easter design and took an enormous amount of pride in their creation.

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Easter Cards

As the finishing touches were added to the decorative logs I began to explain how to twist the wool around their Easter card frame. 

Threading wool in to Easter Card

 

Next they scoured the surrounding field for pretty spring flowers and leaves to weave into the frame. Finally they opened their cards to write and draw their chosen Easter Messages.

 

Decorating Nature Inspired Easter Cards

A treat from the Easter Bunny

They were some delightful results with both the Easter cards and decorative logs. With so many attending I was glad I had prepared well with all the basic elements, leaving the children with the creative finding and decorating.  I know from our Christmas Logs and Halloween Logs just how much time they can take. There was just one final treat, the Easter Bunny had revisited the Fairy Garden while the children were working and hidden some little chocolate bunnies for them to find. 

 

Chocolate bunnies in the Fairy Garden

See how we made both crafts on Video

 

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First Spring Lamb Born Early March

Posted on March 15th, 2019 - Fiona

There are a few signs for me that spring is really with us. First are the snowdrops and daffodils, then the lengthening days and warmth in the midday sun. Finally the big one here is the birth of our first spring lamb. This year it is Ebony, who I saved from the pot last year, and now leads the way.

 

First Spring Lamb Born Early March

A lucky escape for Ebony

Ebony was herself hand raised having been abandoned by her mother. She has proved to be a gentle and friendly sheep with our guests, but a dubious mother herself. Last year she had twins and rejected one who we raised. Lambo became the star of the farm in spring 2018 but no thanks to Ebony. Farmer Nick was all for calling time on Ebony after twice abandoning her lambs, however I saved her for one more year and now I know I made the right decision.  Ebony has taken to her new son perfectly.

 

Born in the wild

Farmer Nick was feeding the sheep with our guests as the last stop on the morning feed run when he noticed we were one sheep missing. As there was no bleating to indicate being stuck up in the brambles we knew there was a good chance the missing sheep was in labour or just given birth. A scour of the field confirmed our suspicions as Ebony sat nursing her new born up in the trees.  We followed Farmer Nick up the field as he collected the lamb to bring him down and perform the necessary checks with Ebony following close behind.

 

Rescuing Ebony sheep and her spring lamb

Correctly handling a lamb

It may look mean to be suspending the lamb by its legs, but this is actually the safest way, cuddling them to your body may feel instinctive to us but actually risks damaging the new born organs.

Down at the trailer the guests could admire mother and baby while Farmer Nick searched for his new born kit. 

holiday guests meeting first spring lamb

Why tail docking is recommended

In no time the tail is docked with a band below the nerve. This will just fall off in the coming weeks and is pain free. It isn’t essential, but helps prevent muck and poo that inevitably builds up when the full tail is left risking infection.  Iodine on the umbilical cord is also to prevent infection and help the cord dry safely. 

 

tail docking of new born lamb.

A move to the nursery.

We have a special field for our new born spring lambs which is more fox proof. Ebony and her lamb rode in the trailer with me to get there. The rest of the flock looked on with interest as we left them at the cattle grid.

sheep left at cattle grid

Spray marking explained

Before we let mother and baby into their new field Farmer Nick gave them a quick spray. It is hard to see on Ebony as she is so dark, but the 11 means she is the first lamb to give birth to one lamb.

 

Spray paint on sheep

Waiting for more spring lambs 

While Ebony and her new spring lamb enjoy the nursery to themselves, hopefully it won’t be long before another comes to join them. Watching the lambs make friends and skip around together is a real joy.

No wonder spring is such a happy and positive time to be on the farm. We’d love you to come and see them too. Do check out our latest availability this spring.

 


Supervised Bonfire Event for Kids

Posted on February 15th, 2019 - Fiona

We all know fire is dangerous, deserves respect and care, especially when children are near. However with the fear and danger comes fun and excitement. Here on the farm, we have an annual tradition on the back of our Christmas Fun, of saving all the wrapping paper for a big bonfire party. It isn’t a big activity, never the less our supervised bonfire event is one kids look forward to.

 

Supervised Bonfire Event for Kids

A Trailer full of Christmas Debris

All day Christmas Day and Boxing Day Farmer Nick leaves an open trailer out in the car park with a big sign inviting guests to leave their Christmas wrapping, from paper to party hats. This has the dual advantage of not overflowing our bins whilst simultaneously preparing for a fun supervised bonfire event for the kids.

 

 

Safety is Key

Over the years Farmer Nick has created some great firework events for us at both at New Year and Bonfire night. Safety is key; especially with excitable risk taking children around. For this reason, even our Christmas big burn is a supervised bonfire event. It is all carefully set up by Farmer Nick in advance, with a few clear rules:  

Only Farmer Nick starts the fire.
The fire site location is away from the farm and properties, just off the farm track.
The wind needs to be heading away from the path where people stand.
Wind strength needs to be moderate, not still or too strong.
Children are supervised by an adult at all times, as well as having Farmer Nick present.
Wrapping paper needs to be thrown from a safe distance to the fire.
Large windfall branches form the base of the bonfire. This gives substance and structure for the wrapping paper to be added.
Any near misses must be corrected by adults only.

 

Bonfire set up

Let the Fun Begin

Mindful of safety throughout, Farmer Nick invites the guests to join him. They can watch, or take part in, burning the collected waste wrapping paper.  

Carrying cardboard from trailer towards the fire.

Adding Christmas cardboard to the bonfire

Watching the fire with younger children.

Watching the supervised bonfire event

Throwing onto the fire from a safe distance.

Safe bonfire throw

Watching the fire die down to a safe level.

Bonfire at Coombe Mill

 

It is such a simple event, yet on a cold winter’s evening provides welcome warmth to the late afternoon fading light. The joy on the faces of the children joining in is clear to see. This is certainly a part of the Christmas break they will remember.  As I watched the children this year I couldn’t help but remember the fun my own children would have at this event poking at the embers with a big stick long after the flames had died down.

Join our Supervised Bonfire event in 2019

Weather permitting, we will be doing it all again this year, just a part of our Christmas program here on the farm. We’d love you to come and join us.


Christmas crafts anyone can make

Posted on January 11th, 2019 - Fiona

So here we are in January and I’m only just finding the time to write up Christmas! We were so busy with holiday guests and then family visiting that the time ran away. Finally I have one safely delivered  back to  Uni, one back at work one back at collage, 4 back at school, extended family and festive holiday guests left and time to reflect on some of the fun we had. I’m beginning with a post about our Christmas crafts. Ever since I did our Halloween Log craft I knew that it would be perfect to adapt for our Christmas guests. I added a few bits and pieces and before long I had an afternoon of action packed fun waiting for a group of excited pre Christmas children.  

3 clever Christmas crafts anyone can make

Scavenger Hunt to make Christmas Crafts

Having explained to an eager gathering what the afternoon would entail we set off on a special Christmas scavenger hunt. The children had sheets of all the things they needed to find and collect. This was going to form the basis of our Christmas Log Decoration and Christmas bauble.  

Christmas crafts scavenger hunt

Making Christmas logs with Father Christmas

Having put quite a time into preparing my example Christmas Log table decoration I was a little worried about how long it might take in a big group. To speed things up I had pre cut some of the more intricate bits. Just as well I did as it still took longer than I anticipated with sharing scissors and paint. The children took real care over their coke bottle Santa’s and decorated the rest of the log in their own style from the bits we collected and resources I provided.   

Making Christmas craft table decoration logs

Toasting marshmallows

I still had two activities to run but I know Guy had a roaring fire pit waiting for us to toast marshmallows ahead of running the train for the evening so we agreed to return to the games room and finish our crafts after dark.

toasting marshmallows

I may have ruined tea time for a few but the children had a great time dipping their marshmallows in the fire. Succumbing to the excitement of the moment the adults joined in too, after all who can resist a toasted marshmallow?

parents toasting marshmallows

Coombe  Mill Festive Train

Thankfully Guy was not just in charge of the fire but also our train driver for the evening, a few were worried about missing the train but when I pointed out that our train driver was still cooking they stopped worrying. Finally we ran a late train through the Christmas filled tunnel as the daylight fell away.

 

Festive Train

Reindeer food & Christmas baubles

For those still keen to continue crafting we returned to the games room where the bottom of our coke bottles became a container for reindeer food. OK so we have fallow deer, but let’s not be too picky, our Rudolph was still on standby for Santa and needed some special food with magic sprinkle for breakfast the following day (Christmas Eve). Christmas paper and colourful ribbon finished the packaging and the children promised to bring them along the following day for the morning feed run to feed to Rudolph. 

Finally the left over tinsel, ivy, holly and chosen Christmas card pictures were filled into hollow baubles to make take home tree decorations.

 

reindeer food and orniments

There was certainly enough to keep the most active and creative children occupied for the afternoon. With just 2 sleeps left to Christmas the energy levels were riding high and here on the farm the children were thoroughly enjoying the festive build up with us. Join me next week to see the fun we had on Christmas Eve and don’t forget if you fancy leaving the Christmas organisation to us next year and sitting back enjoying a fun festive holiday we are taking bookings now.  

 


Seasonal Peg Fairy and Nature Wand Craft

Posted on November 2nd, 2018 - Fiona

I’m on a bit of a roll with my crafts at the moment. One idea morphs into another and a whole new activity emerges. My latest crafts are all born out of the amazing stickabilty of flour and water. First I used nature on pebbles and then on logs to make a dinosaur log and a Halloween Log. This week I worked on my nature log and came up with a Peg fairy with magic wand and fairy dust.

Seasonal Peg Fairy and Nature Wand Craft

Nature Hunt

The first thing we needed was to go off in search of a log, a stick and some autumn nature.

collecting nature

Building a fairy garden

I had some new additions for the fairy garden I was keen to add so the children helped me decide where these should go.

New ornaments in the fairy garden

Autumn flower fairies

Anyone remember the flower fairy books from their childhood? They captivated my imagination and stuck in my mind creating the autumn habitat on the logs . We piled on acorns, flowers, leaves and more with flour glue before making the peg fairies.

Creating fairy garden log

Magic Fairy wand

Winding some colourful wool around twig made a simple magic wand to add to our log.

Making wool fairy wands

Making a Peg Fairy

We pushed two thick leaves through the peg holes to simultaneously create wings and arms. Then the children chose some material for a skirt. Bingo our easy peg fairy was ready.

Making peg fairies

Magic Fairy Dust

All that was left was to sprinkle some fairy dust. For this I just added a few drops of food colour to sugar. To keep things really natural you could use blackberry juice or any other berry juice instead. The children sprinkled a little dust over their fairy logs placing the bulk in milk bottle tops secured with the flour glue. they were only too happy to pose for a photo with their fairy landscapes.

Peg fairies on logs

The children were all quite young and I knew they would need a little help to pull this one off but they managed really well thanks to some great parental support and a concept that captured their imaginations.

Create a Peg Fairy Log and wand at home

This would be a fun and educational activity to recreate from a family woodland walk.

What you’ll Need

Seasonal nature gathered from a walk to include things like leaves, berries, acorns, conkers, pine cones, twigs, feathers

A small log with one stable side as a base.

A small twig for a wand

dolly peg

Two evergreen leaves with structure for wings and arms

Flour and water paste

sugar and food colour for fairy dust

Colourful wool or ribbon for wand.

A rectangle of material with small cut at the centre for a fairy skirt

Educational Benefits

Creativity

Imaginative play

Dexterity

The opportunity to explore changes in nature with the seasons 

Suitable For Age 4 – 12

 

 

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